Vail is a tiny town at the foot of the Vail Mountains and nestled in the White River National Forest. The picturesque town is a prime ski resort destination in the winter, but also provides ample entertainment in the summer. Vail also has a creek that literally runs through town – follow the winding curves of Gore Creek on a walk some peaceful afternoon.
The forty-five mile trip takes four and a half hours to ride, as it is still coal-fired, and winds along narrow mountain paths and in and out of canyons. Historic narration is available on the trains for interested tourists. Both the Silverton and Durango ends of the line have railroad museums; the Durango Museum contains artifacts pertaining to the history of railroading, and the Silverton Museum displays a Baldwin Locomotive from 1902 in the original 1882 Depot.
The Benson Park Sculpture Garden rests on ten acres of land in the heart of Loveland, Colorado. There are 148 permanent sculptures on display, representing almost every medium, and the pieces have been gathered from around the world. Beautifully landscaped and set around charming water features, the garden has wide paved walkways that facilitate wheelchairs and strollers.
The National Museum of World War II Aviation in Colorado Springs focuses on education, primarily in helping visitors and K-12 students understand the role of aviation in the Second World War and how it shaped our world. The museum has twenty-two flyable aircraft in a hangar adjacent to both the Colorado Springs airport and Peterson AFB. In a second hangar visitors can watch volunteers restore World War II planes.
Since Colorado plays hard, residents and visitors are always hungry. Most festivals offer local food, but some are dedicated to it. A Taste of Colorado is Denver’s summer farewell and one of the tastiest ways to cap off summer. And if you can’t wait until then, head to Civic Center Park Tuesday through Thursday from May to October for a mass gathering of food trucks.
"It's good to see Denver not so far behind the other counties now, it seems like we're more in line with other counties now." said Stephanie Helzer, Mile High Station & Ironworks Director of Sales & Marketing. "We're just trying to show that we can safely run an event. [For example] you can go into a supermarket and you're walking around mingling. Events aren't like that. We have full control of what's going on, and we've been wanting to be heard. I do feel like this 5 Star program is going to give us the opportunity to show that we can run [events] safely,"
With professional teams in all the major national leagues, Coloradoans have options. All of Colorado’s pro sports, including hockey, basketball, football, baseball, soccer and lacrosse call Denver home. Catch a game at any time of year in the Mile High City. Celebrate the world’s best winter athletes each January in Aspen. From big air in the superpipe to blazing racers at downhill slalom, catch all of the events live, most are free to watch.
The Denver Museum of Nature & Science began with one man, Edwin Carter, who in 1868 moved to a one-room cabin high in the Rocky Mountains and singlehandedly amassed the largest collection of Colorado fauna in existence. In 1908, the museum in Denver formally opened, and it made world headlines when in 1926 museum researchers found fossil proof that North America was inhabited over 10,000 years ago.
Buffalo Bill gained famed during his buffalo-hunting days, but he later went on to run a popular Wild West Show, drawing in big names like Annie Oakley and Sitting Bull. He died here in Colorado at Lookout Mountain, and Buffalo Bill’s Museum was built here to commemorate him. See his firearms and Native American artifacts, or learn more at Golden Buffalo Bill Days, a true celebration of the Wild West festival in the historic town of Golden.
"It's good to see Denver not so far behind the other counties now, it seems like we're more in line with other counties now." said Stephanie Helzer, Mile High Station & Ironworks Director of Sales & Marketing. "We're just trying to show that we can safely run an event. [For example] you can go into a supermarket and you're walking around mingling. Events aren't like that. We have full control of what's going on, and we've been wanting to be heard. I do feel like this 5 Star program is going to give us the opportunity to show that we can run [events] safely,"
Bent’s Old Fort had an important secondary role as the only permanent settlement on the Santa Fe Trail, and it was a godsend for travelers and soldiers who could stop for repairs, replenish their supplies, and enjoy good food, water, and company. Disaster and disease closed the fort in 1849; reconstruction began in 1876, and guided tours of the fort are a must for families and history buffs.
Cliff Palace and Balcony House are ancient cliff dwellings that the ancestral Pueblo Indians inhabited in the 12th and 13th centuries. Located in Mesa Verde National Park, both are World Heritage Sites and National Monuments. Balcony House had forty-five rooms and two kivas (ovens), and it can only be accessed on ranger-guided tours. Tour participants must climb a thirty-two foot ladder and then crawl through a twelve-foot tunnel to access Balcony House.
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