Red Rocks Amphitheatre is a stone formation near Morrison, Colorado. Conveniently located 15 miles outside of Denver, the raw beauty of these rocks is sure to impress you. Thought to have been used by the Ute tribe prior to westward expansion, the rock formations provide ideal acoustics for live music performances – bands and artists perform on a rock stage!

The forty-five mile trip takes four and a half hours to ride, as it is still coal-fired, and winds along narrow mountain paths and in and out of canyons. Historic narration is available on the trains for interested tourists. Both the Silverton and Durango ends of the line have railroad museums; the Durango Museum contains artifacts pertaining to the history of railroading, and the Silverton Museum displays a Baldwin Locomotive from 1902 in the original 1882 Depot.
The multi-tower buildings are still well preserved after eight hundred years, and seeing them is worth driving to the remote location on the Colorado/Utah border. Dogs are welcome on the hiking trails. The Square Tower Group has a small interpretative center, and rangers are available throughout the park to answer questions and give guidance. Hovenweep has a primitive 31-site campground that fills up on a first-come, first-served basis.

Today, the museum is a center for education, research, and tourism. It is centered on family experiences and holds permanent collections and rotating exhibits. Displays of and about dinosaurs, robots, space, weather, and expert docents give every visitor a memorable trip, and the planetarium and the IMAX theater have revolving shows and delight all ages. An innovative children’s center is perfect for visits with young children.
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Since Colorado plays hard, residents and visitors are always hungry. Most festivals offer local food, but some are dedicated to it. A Taste of Colorado is Denver’s summer farewell and one of the tastiest ways to cap off summer. And if you can’t wait until then, head to Civic Center Park Tuesday through Thursday from May to October for a mass gathering of food trucks.
The park has day areas for picnics and changing rooms, or you can stay overnight if you want to extend your trip. Explore the nearby hiking trails or bring your bike if you’re a cyclist. You can always relax in the springs and soothe your sore muscles after. The beauty and unique stone formations around the springs will make your visit well worth it.

You don’t have to love tea to enjoy a tour of Celestial Seasonings. Its headquarters, just outside Boulder, not only provides a behind-the-scenes look at how tea is made but also has some unique attractions that are a whole lot of fun. Take a whiff inside the Mint Room and see how long you can stand it. Spend some time in the tea shop or enjoy a casual outing at the Celestial Café. It also has an art gallery and a herb garden.
In twenty-five acres of Colorado, more gold has been mined than in all of Alaska and California combined. The Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine was at the heart of Colorado’s gold mining industry, and this tour takes visitors into mine shafts and tunnels that have been worked since 1889. An elevator ferries visitors 1,000 feet below the earth, and it is not for the claustrophobic.

With professional teams in all the major national leagues, Coloradoans have options. All of Colorado’s pro sports, including hockey, basketball, football, baseball, soccer and lacrosse call Denver home. Catch a game at any time of year in the Mile High City. Celebrate the world’s best winter athletes each January in Aspen. From big air in the superpipe to blazing racers at downhill slalom, catch all of the events live, most are free to watch.


The forty-five mile trip takes four and a half hours to ride, as it is still coal-fired, and winds along narrow mountain paths and in and out of canyons. Historic narration is available on the trains for interested tourists. Both the Silverton and Durango ends of the line have railroad museums; the Durango Museum contains artifacts pertaining to the history of railroading, and the Silverton Museum displays a Baldwin Locomotive from 1902 in the original 1882 Depot.
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